Job Seeking During COVID-19 with Mac Prichard [Podcast]

Job Seeking During COVID-19 with Mac Prichard [Podcast]

Job Seeking During COVID-19

It may not be the ideal time to look for a new job, but you may not have a choice. In this episode of the PR Talk podcast, we talk with the host of Find Your Dream Job Podcast Mac Prichard.

Are there even any jobs out there?

We went from record low unemployment to great depression levels almost overnight. However, some employers are still hiring. Mac points out that while he used to have 200 jobs in his weekly Mac’s List email, he now still has 75 or so. It is a big drop, but not zero.

 

So, what do you do?

The basics matter more than ever. You need to establish a job seeking goal and have a plan. Mac says that using a “spray and pray” approach is even less likely to land you the job you want (or even land you a job at all as that position you randomly applied for is someone else’s dream job and they have put in the effort).

Many positions are never even published and even if they are, they’re likely filled through a referral or personal connection. You need to continue (or start) building relationships via informational interviews and virtual networking.

 

How to network virtually 

Amy asked Mac for some tips to be a successful virtual networker. His key points included:

  • Use the networking tools you always have including the phone, email and social media.
  • Webinars can also be a good virtual networking tool. Connect via LinkedIn with the presenter ahead of time and come with questions to engage and set yourself apart from the crowd.
  • Join professional groups and attend virtual happy hours. Just like an in-person meet-up or happy hour, the more you engage, the more value you will get.

 

The furloughed worker side-hustle

When the conversation reached how to maximize periods of furlough, Mac said furloughs might present ideal times to start side-hustles. You can get a feel for if it will be a good move for your future career or full-time gig. In fact, Mac started his agency as a side-project.

 

A couple of final tips

Don’t forget to take the time to enjoy the things that are good in your life. Even if you need to get a new job now, Mac suggests limiting yourself to 35 hours per week of active job seeking. Otherwise, you will burn out and you need to pace yourself.

Mac left us with a great work-from-home tip. If you are fortunate enough to have a dedicated workspace, shut the door when you are not in there to conserve a sense of balance. If you don’t have a separate space, put your laptop in a drawer at the end of the day or over the weekend. Don’t just work non-stop so the days all blend together. You still need to strive for some work-life balance.

About the guest: Mac Prichard

Mac Prichard is the founder and president of Prichard Communications, which was founded in 2007. He has a master’s degree in public administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Iowa. His career experience includes working for both Earl Blumenauer and John Kitzhaber and founding a second company called Mac’s List.

Connect and follow Mac’s List on social media:

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

Finding a Job During Coronavirus with Dan Lee [Podcast]

Finding a Job During Coronavirus with Dan Lee [Podcast]

Dan Lee On The Three P’s of Job Hunting

Dan’s career-growth advice applies to more than just active job-seekers.

You may remember Dan Lee with PR Talent from past PR talk episodes. In fact, I enjoy talking with him so much that I’ve actually had him on the podcast multiple times before the Coronavirus storm hit the world. So, of course, I immediately thought of him when I decided to pivot the podcast and talk about the things that are stressing us out during these highly unusual times. The loss of jobs tops the list of current stressors for many of us. 

Dan is a great resource to turn to during this time because his firm is unique. PR Talent specializes in filling communications and PR jobs for both agencies and corporations. But since he’s worked in the field, spending 16 years at Weber Shandwick, before starting PR Talent’s northwest operation, he has a keen understanding of what we do on a daily basis as communicators.

Sectors That Are Hiring & In-Demand Skills

Before getting into Dan’s job seeking tips, we quickly touched on the current state of the job market. Of course, it isn’t all puppies and kittens, with the majority of companies at least temporarily pausing their hiring, but Dan outlined the few sectors that are still hiring, such as education, technology, and legal. He also touched on key skills that companies need right now to give you the cutting-edge, including internal communications, crisis preparations and digital savviness.

 

The Three P’s of The Job Search

Dan used what he calls his “Three P’s” to provide a framework for discussing the job search process. The Three P’s are: being prepared, proactive and patient.

 

P #1: Be Prepared

If you’ve listened to Dan’s previous episodes on PR Talk you might already be prepared. Dan has talked before about getting your ducks in a row even when you don’t have the time — for instance, keeping an updated LinkedIn profile and continuously networking with at least one key group — in order to be prepared when the time to make a move comes. 

This is especially relevant to those who are hanging onto current jobs out of fear or desperation. It’s probably not advisable to move away from a current job right now. But with the extra time you’re saving on not commuting, you could examine what you want from your career and take preparedness steps to get there. Even if you have lost a job, now could be a good time to prepare by examining what lights your fire.

 

P #2: Be Proactive

This is not the time to “coast” if you are in a current job that you are feeling lukewarm about. While you need to get your work done to the best of your ability, you could still take advantage of this time and reach out to your networks, just to check-in and see how they are doing. This could go a long way in reminding people about you and possibly help you open the door for conversations about new opportunities when you are ready.

If you have lost your job, don’t just sit around eating bonbons or binging on Netflix all day. While indulging in some of that is fine, don’t use the current state of the economy as an excuse to do nothing. Treat your job search as you would a job. For example, actively network with past colleagues by setting up virtual “coffee dates” or “happy hours,” and put what you’re looking for out on the table while reconnecting. 

Dan suggests you network with him as well since he is a matchmaker for current and future job openings and current and future job seekers. This can apply even if you are currently happily employed. Harkening back to the first P, you should always be thinking about the future and voicing your long-term goals to people who can help you.

 

P #3: Be Patient

Lastly, Dan gives us some grace by reminding us to be patient. This means that you should take the time to enjoy walking outside as the weather gets nicer, practice self-care like meditation and reading, and generally understand that things take time. The best opportunities come to those who aren’t reaching for the next shiny object.

“Challenge brings opportunity,” Dan said, pointing out that now is an excellent time to manage our careers while taking stock of where we are and where we want to be. Again reminding me to pause, reflect and make necessary adjustments.

About the guest: Dan Lee

Dan Lee is a Managing Director at PR Talent and leads the firm’s recruiting efforts in the Northwest region. His career experience includes sports broadcasting, sports marketing, and 16 years with Weber Shandwick, where he was a vice president.

Connect and follow Dan on social media:

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

Dan Lee: Should Media Members Switch to PR? [Podcast]

Dan Lee: Should Media Members Switch to PR? [Podcast]

Should Media Members Switch to PR?


Dan Lee with PR Talent 

Dan Lee, from PR Talent, is back to talk about how and why members of the media are transitioning to careers in communications. Dan is a recruiter that works with agencies and companies looking for PR and communications talent. As a former journalist himself, he has great insight into transitioning from being a member of the media to communications.

Dan talks about how most broadcast journalist’s resumes he sees are a grocery list of their segments. This may be effective if they want to land their next tv gig, but it doesn’t do much for hiring managers looking for a PR pro. 

He has found that journalists often struggle in PR, at least initially, because at their media organization they have an assignment editor telling them what to report on (remember Dan was a reporter, he’s been there). As communications professionals know, no one hands us assignments. What PR people do and how we do it is pretty hard to explain. All the elements that go into building a PR plan and determining what the goals. How do we do it? How do we measure it? Those are all new skills that media people will have to learn.

Dan then talks about how many organizations are creating internal newsrooms. Companies like Amazon and Starbuck are hiring former broadcast journalists to help tell their stories. To tell the companies culture stories with internal newsroom made up of former reporters and film crew folks to show the brand for positioning and recruiting. These jobs are hard to find as they typically still have traditional communications titles such as internal communications, corporate communication or content creator, but there are opportunities.

To end this episode Dan provides media folks three suggestions for breaking into PR: 

  1. Fix your resume. Sorry, there is no silver bullet. But you can email Dan directly, at [email protected], and he’ll share his insight with you. Dan has a 2-minute resume formatting video
  2. Use a resume coach or a job coach. Dan is not a coach, but he knows some.
  3. Have coffee with someone that has already done it (made the transition).

Want to hear more from Dan? You can listen to his first appearance on PR Talk where he talks about what makes a great communications hire or his thoughts on the difference between in-house and agency jobs

About the guest: Dan Lee

Dan Lee is a Managing Director at PR Talent and leads the firm’s recruiting efforts in the Northwest region. His career experience includes sports broadcasting, sports marketing, and 16 years with Weber Shandwick, where he was a vice president.

Connect and follow Dan on social media:

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

Agency vs. In-House with Dan Lee  [Podcast]

Agency vs. In-House with Dan Lee [Podcast]

The PR Agency Grind versus the In-House Comms Department Cake-Walk?


Not so fast, says Dan Lee with PR Talent.

This week’s PR Talk episode features my best friend Dan Lee with PR Talent. We’ve only met once so I don’t know if he knows that we are best friends yet. Basically, I was wondering if he could just sit in my office with me all day, every day and just be my PR cheerleader and hold my hand as I trudge down the road of painful PR.

This week we’re airing the 2nd half of the conversation that I had with Dan a while back. He works on placing PR unicorns in either agency or in-house settings. Since his company only focuses on recruiting for PR roles, his knowledge about the field is extremely dense, plus Dan worked at agencies and as sports-broadcaster in a past life.

Also, to remind you, if you are in PR or looking to get into PR, you do not pay Dan to work with you. The company where you are placed pays PR Talent, which you might view as a positive if you are evaluating companies because you probably want to work for the type of company that has the resources to invest in finding perfect you. It shows how much they value what you will bring to the table and how your role fill will affect the organization.

After delving into some of the pitfalls and stresses of working at an agency, we, of course, talked about the many upsides like the variety in work and the comradery. Dan mentioned that many new PR pros with three-four years of experience end up wanting to go in-house, with in-house communications departments aggressively trying to hire agency talent.

What makes the in-house gig so attractive? Dan thinks the work-life balance may be appealing but he warns us that nothing is perfect and you’ll have to get really savvy maneuvering your way through the murky waters of in-house politics, bringing stress at all hours. And while you historically make a little bit more money in-house, the competition is fierce for the small amount of in-house jobs available.

We then moved on to talk about the random but fun topics of:

  • The newly popular phenomenon of ghosting in the job-seeking market.
  • How stress in PR is based upon a game we play against ourselves in the way of constantly needing to improve.
  • The importance of celebrating small successes. Dan’s example of firing an agency client may sound counter-intuitive but it was meaningful for his team at the time.

Tune-in in two weeks if you’re a media member looking to make the leap into PR. Dan has some tips and surprising news for you on this front. And if you liked what Dan had to stay, check out his past PR Talk episode here.

About the guest: Dan Lee

Dan Lee is a Managing Director at PR Talent and leads the firm’s recruiting efforts in the Northwest region. His career experience includes sports broadcasting, sports marketing, and 16 years with Weber Shandwick, where he was a vice president.

Connect and follow Dan on social media:

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Roles and Mindset [Podcast]

PR Roles and Mindset [Podcast]

What kind of PR person are you?

PR roles and how they relate to the PR mindset.

Mike and Amy talk about the different types of roles played in the PR game. Entire jobs could encompass just one of the roles, but more often than not PR people dabble within all of these roles.

Before digging into the types of PR roles, Amy focused on the mindset successful PR people need to have. No matter where you take your career, the PR mindset can guide you towards excellence in any field, beyond this industry. This mindset incorporates three central elements: never giving up, maximizing all campaigns, and serving as the best “secretary” for clients and media.

The different types of PR roles that were explained include:

  • The publicist
  • The B2B’er
  • The numbers-pusher
  • The do-gooder
  • The inside-agent
  • The fire-stopper
  • The strategist

Listen for an in-depth discussion as Mike & Amy unpack each category. In fact, there are so many exciting roles PR people can play, Mike pointed out that we were missing some, such as public affairs specialist, the digital maximizer and the PIO.

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.