SEMpdx Event: What’s New for 2019 in Digital Marketing

SEMpdx Event: What’s New for 2019 in Digital Marketing

I recently attended SEMpdx’s monthly educational event featuring a panel of digital marketing experts. They were tasked with providing insight into what is new (or will be new) in digital marketing for 2019.

As we have done previously when we think a topic may fit our PR Talk audience, we record it.

If you can’t tell, we are focusing PR Talk on digital marketing with the Engage Conference coming up on March 7th & 8th, where Amy will be speaking about Digital PR.

This PR Talk Podcast was recorded live at SEMpdx’s:

What’s New for 2019 in Digital Marketing Panel

Description:

Expert SEMpdx panel featuring a Q&A discussion on What’s New for 2019 in Digital Marketing.

Panelists:

Anna Hutson

Anna Hutson

Founder & CEO, Avenue

Kevin Getch

Kevin Getch

Founder & Lead SEO, Webfor

Scott Hendison

Scott Hendison

Founder, Search Commander, Inc.

Ryan Campbell

Ryan Campbell

Assoc Director Demand Gen, Obility

Caleb Donegan

Caleb Donegan

VP of Digital, Vacasa

Moderator:

Matthew Brown
Consultant, SEMpdx Advisory Board Member

 

Questions discussed during the event include:

What changed in 2018? What did 2018 teach you for 2019?

How did Google’s changes in 2018 effect SEO and Paid Search for B2B industries?

Managing a big enterprise client, did you have an advantage in 2018?

Do you need more content to perform well in specific industries (recipes given as an example)?

As agency owners, how would you change the mix of what you offer your clients in 2019?

What is quality content?

How will the technical elements of SEO matter in 2019?

In regards to schema mark-up, should you mark-up all that you can or just specific things?

Should you delete old content (blog posts) on your site?

What Google My Business (GMB) and local SEO stuff should we know about?

What is your prediction for voice search and the written word in regards to voice search?

How will website privacy impact 2019?

What will Bing do in 2019?

Share something new and improved for 2019 that you are excited about (tools, blogs, etc.)?

Do you have insights on email marketing and SEO podcasts to listen to?

 

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Talk is sponsored by monday

In such a fast-paced, multi-faceted work environment, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. monday is the collaboration tool trusted by businesses of all kinds to help cut down the clutter and streamline productivity. Learn more at monday.com and signup for a free trial. You’ll see in no time why so many teams around the world are choosing monday for their project management needs. PR Talk listeners can use the coupon code BetterExecute for a 15% discount.
Minicast: A weird & kinda random conversation about SEMpdx’s Engage Conference

Minicast: A weird & kinda random conversation about SEMpdx’s Engage Conference

What Should I Talk About?!!

What can I tell you about digital PR that you didn’t already know?

What do you think about 3 Hacks to Win the Digital PR Game?

How about What is Digital PR?

Your Top 10 Questions Answered?

Or maybe 6 Ways Digital PR Can Save Your Business in 2019?

I am speaking again at this year’s Engage Conference and if it seems like I am hunting for a presentation topic, I am. This year my general topic is Digital PR and I want to get started on putting my deck together.

And who loves you? Since I’m speaking, you can also use my speaker discount “ROSENBERG” to get another $100 off your ticket.

Last year’s presentation was How to PR Your Way to the Top of Google. You can check out the video below or see more particular on our Engage page from 2018 (there is a discount code).

What’s My Topic?

So, back to my original question. What Digital PR questions do you want to see covered? Maybe you’re a local business owner that has a question. Or your fellow PR pro and wanting to know the latest trends. Maybe you’re someone working in marketing and want some advice on PR tactics that can be applied online?

Reach out and contact us in an email, phone call, LinkedIn post, or in a Tweet.

What is the Engage Conference?

Oh, you may be wondering what is the Engage Conference?

Thankfully, I am married to someone who has been affiliated with the event for more than a decade. Mike is currently on the advisory board for the Search Engine Marketers of Portland (SEMpdx), which is the nonprofit that hosts the event.

The Engage Conference was formerly known as Searchfest, and this will be its 13th year. They switched its name from Searchfest to Engage a few years ago, because the one-day conference was so much more than just about search.

And now the conference has even outgrown its one-day. Beginning this year, it will be a two-day conference packed with some of the biggest names in digital marketing but at about ⅓ the cost of similar conferences.

“It was an amazing one-day conference but because it was so amazing, we’ve added a second day this year,” Mike said. “More opportunities for great content, opportunities for more keynotes, more parties. Oh, and more networking opportunities and all that stuff. So, more of everything and not much more of a ticket price.”

Why should you attend the Engage Conference?

Well, I did mention that I was speaking, right?

Seriously, it is two days and four concurrent tracks. There are session topics for wherever you work in the marketing/sales funnel. There are sessions about social and building a brand. There are sessions on content marketing. There are technical SEO sessions. There are sessions on conversion rate optimization, and making a sale. There are sessions oriented toward enterprise businesses, and sessions for small, local businesses.

The Engage Conference is like Oprah. There are sessions for everyone. You get a session. And you get a session.

Why you should buy your ticket now?

Exciting stuff, right? And we haven’t even talked about the keynote speakers, the free session videos after the event, the after party, the pub crawl, meeting awesome folks who will become friends for a lifetime and so much more.

But you shouldn’t wait too long. Ticket prices increase on Friday, Feb. 1. And it’s hefty increase so you should buy your tickets now. The event is March 7th and 8th at Portland’s Sentinel Hotel.

Seriously, what should I talk about?

 

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Talk is sponsored by monday

In such a fast-paced, multi-faceted work environment, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. monday is the collaboration tool trusted by businesses of all kinds to help cut down the clutter and streamline productivity. Learn more at monday.com and signup for a free trial. You’ll see in no time why so many teams around the world are choosing monday for their project management needs.

PR Talk listeners can use the coupon code BetterExecute for a 15% discount.

Podcast: Mac Prichard: Prichard Communications

Podcast: Mac Prichard: Prichard Communications

Prichard Communications: Using superpowers for good

You wouldn’t intuitively think starting an agency during a recession is a good idea, but that’s just what Mac Prichard did in the spring of 2007.

On the brink of celebrating its 12th anniversary, Prichard Communications now has a team of five and may hire another this year. But Mac’s obligations don’t stop there. He founded and currently runs another company called Mac’s List and continues making connections with his Portland 10, a powerful networking event for social changemakers in Portland.

“I would say, in hindsight, a recession is a good time to start a firm if you’ve got the resources to do it and the flexibility,” Mac told me in our recent podcast interview recorded just before the holidays. “Because it’s a tough time to look for a job and it’s a good time to take risks.”

A young Mac’s 3 things

Even though he didn’t know it at the time, Mac was gearing up to run a mission-driven agency all along. He graduated college the University of Iowa with three goals.  

“I wanted to get paid to write. I wanted to work on election campaigns and I wanted to do human rights advocacy and I’ve done all three in my career,” Mac said. “I’ve worked for a human rights group in Washington, D.C. I was a spokesperson for the largest public works project in America at Boston’s Big Dig. I ran communications for a refugee resettlement agency in Massachusetts. I’ve worked for elected officials in Oregon, for both Earl Blumenauer and John Kitzhaber, and served as a spokesperson for four different state agencies.

“But the constant that runs through all these different jobs is they’ve given me a chance to work on issues I care about or make a difference in the community where I live and work.”

Political campaigns are the ultimate startup

He said his work in campaigns was great training for starting a business.

“It starts usually with a conversation around a kitchen table. And the money comes from friends and family. And there’s a product, it’s the candidate,” Mac said. “And on election night you know whether you had a sale or not and then you shut it down.

“After having created all these systems, hired people, presented a product, and sold it, you start all over again. I’ve been through that process about a dozen times. My win-loss record was about 50/50. So, I had my share of failures. But like a good startup culture, like the one in the Bay Area, there’s no stigma with failing. If you ran a good campaign, it’s just seen as part of the learning process.”

 

Finding your niche

Prichard Communications is a social change communications firm that works locally, as well as nationally. Their clients include the Meyer Memorial Trust, the Ford Family Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation among others. They also work with purpose-driven brands, local governments and public agencies, including the City of Hillsboro, Clackamas County and the Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District.

The agency is a Certified B Corp., meaning it’s thinking about the triple bottom line. “So, we not only think about the profit, but we also think about the community benefit, and environmental consequences of our work,” Mac said.

That is one of the many things I admire about Mac and his agency. I think with any successful firm, you need to get clear about the clients you want to serve. And the more focused you are, the better you’ll understand their needs and the better you’ll be able to serve them. It seems that the best firms always have a niche.

 

Beginning with the end in mind

Mac said they begin each client engagement by identifying the desired business outcomes their clients want and then work backward in developing a communications plan or project.

“And usually, they fall into one or all of three buckets,” Mac said. “Usually the organizations that hire us want to attract funding of some kind. Maybe it’s a grant. Maybe it’s increasing membership dues, bringing in some sort of revenue. The second bucket is usually audience growth. Maybe they want to bring more people to their website. They want a bigger audience. And the third is usually a policy change. So maybe they need help working with elected officials. There’s an idea they want to get in front of policymakers out there at the local or national level. So, whatever those results are. That’s where we start with our clients and we work back from those outcomes to build communications programs.”

 

The work is still about telling stories

If you’ve worked in PR and communications over the last 10 years, you’ve seen how much the work has changed. But some things have remained consistent.

“When I started my career, it was all about media relations and it was about getting past the gatekeepers to help the organizations and the people I work for tell their stories,” Mac said. “We’re still telling stories and helping our clients tell them. But now we’re making our own media or we’re helping our clients do that.”

Mac said a lot of what he and his team do is teach their clients how to do communications themselves. For example, they are helping the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation create a Grantee University, which will be an online learning platform that teaches the organizations receiving grants from the foundation how to tell stories.

“In the end, it’s going to increase the capacity of their grantees. And so that when a grant ends, they’re going to have the skills and the knowledge that they need to successfully tell their stories and get their communications results,” Mac said.

 

Running an agency

While Mac had a diverse career prior to starting Prichard Communications, it didn’t include the traditional stint in a PR agency. So, he faced a steep learning curve when he started his agency.

His advice? He’s a multiple year alumni of the PRSA’s Counselors Academy, which is a professional interest section within PRSA and, according to its website, “is dedicated to helping members succeed through access to collaborative peer relationships, meaningful professional development and education programs, and information on best practices in public relations counseling.”

“And that’s where I learned the nuts and bolts of how to run an agency,” Mac said. “It was transformational. I’ve gone five years in a row to that conference. It gives me a chance to work with other agency owners and leaders from all over the country and most of them are in very different niches. But the principles of how to run a successful agency are the same whatever your client base or the services you offer.”

 

Mac’s PR advice

I asked Mac if he had any advice for someone new to the PR industry. He said to connect with people in the companies where you’d want to work or who are doing the work you’d like to do. Go learn how the staff and the founders got where they are, what they are doing day-to-day and learn from those experiences.

“Think about what you’re passionate about. The issues that you care about. And where you want to make a difference,” Mac said. “And go to work for organizations, perhaps in the nonprofit world as a communications professional, that are doing the work you care about.”

About the guest: Mac Prichard

Mac Prichard is the founder and president of Prichard Communications, which was founded in 2007. He has a master’s degree in public administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Iowa. His career experience includes working for both Earl Blumenauer and John Kitzhaber and founding a second company called Mac’s List.

Connect and follow Mac on social media:

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Talk is sponsored by monday

In such a fast-paced, multi-faceted work environment, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. monday is the collaboration tool trusted by businesses of all kinds to help cut down the clutter and streamline productivity. Learn more at monday.com and signup for a free trial. You’ll see in no time why so many teams around the world are choosing monday for their project management needs.

PR Talk listeners can use the coupon code BetterExecute for a 15% discount.

Minicast: Role of Ethics in Marketing

Minicast: Role of Ethics in Marketing

The Role of Ethics in Marketing

I was asked to join an AMA-PDX panel discussion event on the Role of Ethics in Marketing. Listen to this minicast for a sneak peek on one of the topics, “Fake News”, and attend the FREE event on Thursday, January 17 at UO Portland.

In addition to a discussion around Fake News, we share details of the upcoming Oregon Ethics in Business Awards. Read more about our take on Fake News: A Dangerous Accusation for the PR Industry.

The Role of Ethics in Marketing at UO Portland

Mike Rosenberg will join Nick Footer, CEO of Intuitive Digital and Deb Hatcher, Founder, Chief Marketing & Sales Officer of A to Z Wineworks on a panel to discuss the role of ethics in marketing. Topics will include copyright issues, branding, the “fake news” movement, and understanding what information is reliable.

This free event is hosted by the American Marketing Association.

}

6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Doors open at 6 pm
Networking 6 – 6:45 pm
Presentation 6:45 -7:30 pm
Networking 7:30 – 8 pm

January 17th

Hosted by UO SOJC Portland
2 drink tickets/person
Hors-d’oeuvres & dessert

University of Oregon in Portland

Main Event Room
70 NW Couch Street
Portland, OR 97209

The Role of Ethics in Marketing

At the University of Oregon in Portland – White Stag Block

Free Event

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

Podcast: Misty Tompoles : Artslandia

Podcast: Misty Tompoles : Artslandia

How Collaboration Can be a Winning Strategy:

A Conversation with Artlandia’s Misty Tompoles

When Misty Tompoles took over what was to become Artslandia, she quickly had to learn a lesson familiar to all PR pros: think collaboratively to creatively find and engage with your key audiences.

For Tompoles that meant developing a new model for how performing arts playbills — the program you receive when attending an opera, ballet, theater or other arts event — were published. She worked with Portland’s arts community, convincing them to advertise in the playbills of each other’s events. So the audience attending an opera would see a promotion for an upcoming theater show, and vice versa.

In this week’s podcast, we chat with Misty, who is the publisher and founder of Artslandia. She is an amazing entrepreneur who started her company when she was 24. In our interview she talks about the events that led to her taking the entrepreneurial plunge and what has resulted over the last 20 years.

Artslandia is a diverse family of media, including a variety of Artslandia titles, performing arts playbills, custom publishing services, new media options, and sponsorships. Its print publications boast a circulation of more than 800,000 annually with a readership of 1.5 million.

They are a Portland institution, but are now expanding to other cities with the first being Vancouver, BC.

Misty also talks about the Artslandia App they created, as well as the Artslandia Box subscription, which delivers culture to you each month.

 

It’s a fascinating conversation with Misty because she’s an entrepreneur, publisher, and mom. I hope you enjoy it.

About the guest: Misty Topoles

Misty Tompoles is the founder and publisher of Artslandia Publishing. She graduated Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, in 1995 with a degree in English Literature. She took over PlaybillsNW in 1995, later relaunching the business as Artslandia Publishing in 2006.

Connect and follow Misty on social media:

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Talk is sponsored by monday

In such a fast-paced, multi-faceted work environment, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. monday is the collaboration tool trusted by businesses of all kinds to help cut down the clutter and streamline productivity. Learn more at monday.com and signup for a free trial. You’ll see in no time why so many teams around the world are choosing monday for their project management needs.

PR Talk listeners can use the coupon code BetterExecute for a 15% discount.

Podcast: Mark Garber: Pamplin Media Group

Podcast: Mark Garber: Pamplin Media Group

The Importance of Community Newspapers
A Conversation with Pamplin Media Group

We all have a sense of the power that The New York Times or even The Oregonian wield, but less appreciated is the influence of a Beaverton Valley Times or a Forest Grove News Times and the countless other community newspapers around Portland’s metro area and across the nation.

But PR professionals understand the power of local papers for their clients, where getting in front of local communities is critical to their success.

In this episode of PR Talk, I sat down with Mark Garber, publisher of the Pamplin Media Group.

We talked about the history of the Pamplin Media Group, the role of a publisher, as well as the current challenges community newspapers are facing and what that may mean for PR professionals.

The Pamplin Media Group owns and publishes 25 papers throughout Oregon, 21 of which are published weekly or twice weekly. Its flagship paper is the Portland Tribune, which was founded in 2001. Some of the other papers in the group have been publishing more than 100 years.

Mark has a long career in newspapers. He studied journalism at the University of South Carolina and started his career as a reporter at a newspaper near the university covering cops and city government.

Later, he moved to Oregon and worked at a number of community newspapers in the Portland metro area. About 10 years into his career, he transitioned to publishing community newspapers in Gresham and Springfield. He was the publisher of the East Oregonian in Pendleton before joining the Portland Tribune/Pamplin Media Group in 2001.

He said you can think of a publisher as the CEO of the business of a newspaper.

“All departments within a newspaper ultimately report to the publisher,” Mark said in our interview. “And the publisher is the one link traditionally between the news side and the advertising side and the circulation side. Newspapers traditionally have operated with a pretty good separation between news and advertising. But there are times when those two aspects of the business do work together. And publishers provide that link and can essentially work with both sides of the business to achieve overall goals. In the digital age, those lines are getting more and more blurred and there is more and more cooperation between the news and advertising side.”

 

What is the difference between what is published online and in print?

Mark said it is not always that different what is being published online and what is being published in the newspapers.

“We put all the breaking news online obviously and then a lot of that news by the time our print editions come out, because we’re either weekly or twice a week, might not be all that relevant anymore,” he said. “We’re daily or actually more than a daily online; and in our printed editions, we try to be a little more reflective of what’s happened over the past few days.”

In terms of community news – the on-the-ground coverage of all of the communities, whether it’s Prineville, Madras, Gresham, Lake Oswego or Beaverton – Pamplin’s newspapers are one of the only remaining sources with reporters covering those communities.

 

The print and digital audiences for newspapers

More than 350,000 people read one of the Pamplin publications in print each month.

But more than 1 million people are coming to their websites each week and consuming the news there in some form or another.

That is a huge digital audience.

“And you know the interesting thing about that is they want the same thing that the print readers want, they just want it in a different form,” Mark said. “And there’s not a lot of overlap between those two audiences.”

Mark said one of the things that surprised him is that those are two distinct audiences. “Some people only read us in print, and some people only read us digitally. And it’s not all generational, but certainly there’s an age factor there, too.”

His point is that within their group of publications, they are delivering that advertising or marketing message with content about the local community within a geographic area that people care about.

“And whether it’s in print or on digital, we can help deliver that marketing message and still be very targeted in how we do it,” Mark said.

Pamplin Media Group Papers

Making money in newspapers and what that means for PR

As Mark points out, producing all that local news is a big investment with more than 100 news people around the state. And the evolution of newspapers and increased competition from other players – such as Craigslist – has meant changing the business model for newspapers with more native advertising or the addition of paywalls to digital sites.

Mark said they have added paywalls to some of the newspapers’ websites, which is something I said worried PR pros who are concerned their clients won’t see the benefit of getting in a publication if the public can’t freely access it.

Mark understood my concern, but also made a couple of interesting points.

“One is that if someone is willing to pay for the news, and this is pretty much true of our print subscribers, they’re households who have discretionary income, they’re a higher demographic typically,” Mark said. “And they are people who are interested in their communities and want to know what’s happening with their school district, with their city government, with their neighbors, and they’re actively involved citizens. It’s a very highly desirable demographic for any business to reach.”

He said they are aware of the challenges paywalls bring to promoting stories on social. One way they’ll address this is by adding more to the content being shared on social so readers have a better sense of the story.

And, he said, paywalls don’t require an annual subscription. He said readers can pay a low cost to be able to access one particular story.

Whether its social or other unforeseen challenges, Mark said, they are tracking visitor traffic to the sites with paywalls to make sure they don’t dramatically lose readers.

 

PR tips from a publisher

I asked Mark if he had any pro tips for how PR people can better get into their local newspapers and, specifically, the Portland Tribune. In addition to Mark’s tips, I recommend listening to PR Talk episode 13 for our interview with Gary Stein, editor for the Lake Oswego Review, one of the Pamplin papers, for more in-depth tips.

Mark had two excellent tips: make it local and establish connections.

It may be a bit harder to do, but Mark said by localizing your PR message to “each community or as many communities as you can, that’s going to greatly increase the chances that item’s going to get in the paper because a local person is involved.”

His second tip is it is much more helpful to establish some sort of personal connection or relationship with the reporter or the editor at the paper. He said his reporters and editors “get literally hundreds, if not thousands, of e-mails every day.”

A press release sent by a stranger may not even get read if it comes as an e-mail. But if you could establish a relationship with that person, take them out to coffee or even just have a couple phone conversations with them, or to drop by the office to say, “Hey, this is who I am and here’s the type of news that I’d like to send you. How can I do that in a way that is helpful to you?”

“Then when you send an email, the reporter will think, ‘I know Amy. I know she’s interested in giving me legitimate news.’ I think that is a good thing.”

 

About the guest: Mark Garber

Mark Garber is President and Publisher of Pamplin Media Group. He received a BS in Journalism from the University of South Carolina in 1977. Since then, he has worked at numerous newspapers and publishing companies both in the eastern US and in Oregon, including those in Gresham, Pendleton, Springfield, and Portland. As Pamplin’s President and Publisher, he oversees all of its operations. 

Connect and follow Mark on social media:

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Talk is sponsored by monday

In such a fast-paced, multi-faceted work environment, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. monday is the collaboration tool trusted by businesses of all kinds to help cut down the clutter and streamline productivity. Learn more at monday.com and signup for a free trial. You’ll see in no time why so many teams around the world are choosing monday for their project management needs.

PR Talk listeners can use the coupon code BetterExecute for a 15% discount.