SEMpdx Event: What’s New for 2019 in Digital Marketing

SEMpdx Event: What’s New for 2019 in Digital Marketing

I recently attended SEMpdx’s monthly educational event featuring a panel of digital marketing experts. They were tasked with providing insight into what is new (or will be new) in digital marketing for 2019.

As we have done previously when we think a topic may fit our PR Talk audience, we record it.

If you can’t tell, we are focusing PR Talk on digital marketing with the Engage Conference coming up on March 7th & 8th, where Amy will be speaking about Digital PR.

This PR Talk Podcast was recorded live at SEMpdx’s:

What’s New for 2019 in Digital Marketing Panel

Description:

Expert SEMpdx panel featuring a Q&A discussion on What’s New for 2019 in Digital Marketing.

Panelists:

Anna Hutson

Anna Hutson

Founder & CEO, Avenue

Kevin Getch

Kevin Getch

Founder & Lead SEO, Webfor

Scott Hendison

Scott Hendison

Founder, Search Commander, Inc.

Ryan Campbell

Ryan Campbell

Assoc Director Demand Gen, Obility

Caleb Donegan

Caleb Donegan

VP of Digital, Vacasa

Moderator:

Matthew Brown
Consultant, SEMpdx Advisory Board Member

 

Questions discussed during the event include:

What changed in 2018? What did 2018 teach you for 2019?

How did Google’s changes in 2018 effect SEO and Paid Search for B2B industries?

Managing a big enterprise client, did you have an advantage in 2018?

Do you need more content to perform well in specific industries (recipes given as an example)?

As agency owners, how would you change the mix of what you offer your clients in 2019?

What is quality content?

How will the technical elements of SEO matter in 2019?

In regards to schema mark-up, should you mark-up all that you can or just specific things?

Should you delete old content (blog posts) on your site?

What Google My Business (GMB) and local SEO stuff should we know about?

What is your prediction for voice search and the written word in regards to voice search?

How will website privacy impact 2019?

What will Bing do in 2019?

Share something new and improved for 2019 that you are excited about (tools, blogs, etc.)?

Do you have insights on email marketing and SEO podcasts to listen to?

 

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Talk is sponsored by monday

In such a fast-paced, multi-faceted work environment, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. monday is the collaboration tool trusted by businesses of all kinds to help cut down the clutter and streamline productivity. Learn more at monday.com and signup for a free trial. You’ll see in no time why so many teams around the world are choosing monday for their project management needs. PR Talk listeners can use the coupon code BetterExecute for a 15% discount.
Minicast: A weird & kinda random conversation about SEMpdx’s Engage Conference

Minicast: A weird & kinda random conversation about SEMpdx’s Engage Conference

What Should I Talk About?!!

What can I tell you about digital PR that you didn’t already know?

What do you think about 3 Hacks to Win the Digital PR Game?

How about What is Digital PR?

Your Top 10 Questions Answered?

Or maybe 6 Ways Digital PR Can Save Your Business in 2019?

I am speaking again at this year’s Engage Conference and if it seems like I am hunting for a presentation topic, I am. This year my general topic is Digital PR and I want to get started on putting my deck together.

And who loves you? Since I’m speaking, you can also use my speaker discount “ROSENBERG” to get another $100 off your ticket.

Last year’s presentation was How to PR Your Way to the Top of Google. You can check out the video below or see more particular on our Engage page from 2018 (there is a discount code).

What’s My Topic?

So, back to my original question. What Digital PR questions do you want to see covered? Maybe you’re a local business owner that has a question. Or your fellow PR pro and wanting to know the latest trends. Maybe you’re someone working in marketing and want some advice on PR tactics that can be applied online?

Reach out and contact us in an email, phone call, LinkedIn post, or in a Tweet.

What is the Engage Conference?

Oh, you may be wondering what is the Engage Conference?

Thankfully, I am married to someone who has been affiliated with the event for more than a decade. Mike is currently on the advisory board for the Search Engine Marketers of Portland (SEMpdx), which is the nonprofit that hosts the event.

The Engage Conference was formerly known as Searchfest, and this will be its 13th year. They switched its name from Searchfest to Engage a few years ago, because the one-day conference was so much more than just about search.

And now the conference has even outgrown its one-day. Beginning this year, it will be a two-day conference packed with some of the biggest names in digital marketing but at about ⅓ the cost of similar conferences.

“It was an amazing one-day conference but because it was so amazing, we’ve added a second day this year,” Mike said. “More opportunities for great content, opportunities for more keynotes, more parties. Oh, and more networking opportunities and all that stuff. So, more of everything and not much more of a ticket price.”

Why should you attend the Engage Conference?

Well, I did mention that I was speaking, right?

Seriously, it is two days and four concurrent tracks. There are session topics for wherever you work in the marketing/sales funnel. There are sessions about social and building a brand. There are sessions on content marketing. There are technical SEO sessions. There are sessions on conversion rate optimization, and making a sale. There are sessions oriented toward enterprise businesses, and sessions for small, local businesses.

The Engage Conference is like Oprah. There are sessions for everyone. You get a session. And you get a session.

Why you should buy your ticket now?

Exciting stuff, right? And we haven’t even talked about the keynote speakers, the free session videos after the event, the after party, the pub crawl, meeting awesome folks who will become friends for a lifetime and so much more.

But you shouldn’t wait too long. Ticket prices increase on Friday, Feb. 1. And it’s hefty increase so you should buy your tickets now. The event is March 7th and 8th at Portland’s Sentinel Hotel.

Seriously, what should I talk about?

 

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Talk is sponsored by monday

In such a fast-paced, multi-faceted work environment, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. monday is the collaboration tool trusted by businesses of all kinds to help cut down the clutter and streamline productivity. Learn more at monday.com and signup for a free trial. You’ll see in no time why so many teams around the world are choosing monday for their project management needs.

PR Talk listeners can use the coupon code BetterExecute for a 15% discount.

Minicast: Role of Ethics in Marketing

Minicast: Role of Ethics in Marketing

The Role of Ethics in Marketing

I was asked to join an AMA-PDX panel discussion event on the Role of Ethics in Marketing. Listen to this minicast for a sneak peek on one of the topics, “Fake News”, and attend the FREE event on Thursday, January 17 at UO Portland.

In addition to a discussion around Fake News, we share details of the upcoming Oregon Ethics in Business Awards. Read more about our take on Fake News: A Dangerous Accusation for the PR Industry.

The Role of Ethics in Marketing at UO Portland

Mike Rosenberg will join Nick Footer, CEO of Intuitive Digital and Deb Hatcher, Founder, Chief Marketing & Sales Officer of A to Z Wineworks on a panel to discuss the role of ethics in marketing. Topics will include copyright issues, branding, the “fake news” movement, and understanding what information is reliable.

This free event is hosted by the American Marketing Association.

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6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Doors open at 6 pm
Networking 6 – 6:45 pm
Presentation 6:45 -7:30 pm
Networking 7:30 – 8 pm

January 17th

Hosted by UO SOJC Portland
2 drink tickets/person
Hors-d’oeuvres & dessert

University of Oregon in Portland

Main Event Room
70 NW Couch Street
Portland, OR 97209

The Role of Ethics in Marketing

At the University of Oregon in Portland – White Stag Block

Free Event

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

What Kind of PR Person Are You?

What Kind of PR Person Are You?

The 8 Types of PR Pros

There are many different types of PR people. However, the type of PR person you choose to be will likely shift throughout your career. Your role within PR may change, the industry you’re representing may change, your entire job description may change — pulling you away from the everyday work of PR. But no matter what you do, the PR mindset will always be with you. Here is my list of some of the most popular PR roles:

 

Media Relations, aka the Publicist:

This is the classic, stereotypical PR role, often what people think of when referring to public relations. They organize red carpets or make sure their clients are on them, often attending impressive events and being in the spotlight in the PR way — off to the side, behind the client who is the star. Publicists get things placed in the media, creating buzz, most often of the consumer variety. They don’t always have to work in the red carpet arena, but they spend their days building the most amount of public attention as possible.

 

Investor Relations, aka the Numbers-Pusher:

Investor Relations, aka the Numbers-Pusher:

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

This position, locked into the financial world, can be mysterious to the uninitiated. The numbers-pusher works for public companies or financial institutions that rely on the opinions of industry analysts. These analysts are essentially the numbers-pusher’s outside spokespeople — their good or bad opinions possibly ending up in the news — ultimately influencing the financial markets, which could mean more, or less, money in shareholders’ pockets. This person manages communications between the company and its investors.

 

Marketing Communications, aka the B2B’er:

This person promotes businesses among other businesses, most often through trade and vertical press. Their work is much more predictable than the publicist’s but they still can get quite busy depending on how hard they push. They may use the trade show as a way to meet other press and important people within the industries they are trying to influence. Trade shows and surrounding events can get crazy. So remember, what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.

 

Community Relations, aka the Do-Gooder:

Community Relations, aka the Do-Gooder:

Photo by Alex Radelich on Unsplash

Community relations is the practice of aligning your organization’s interests with a community group, cause, or charity. This PR pro often leverages their community relations work through earned media, but not always. Some organizations are motivated to connect with their communities on an intimate level for no other reason than to build goodwill, strengthening relationships through activities that sometimes pair with monetary donations. The community relations PR person often interacts with other PR people to support and further events and programs that benefit the community.

 

Internal Relations, aka the Inside Agent:

When you ask a business owner or executive what’s their biggest asset, cost, and headache, you often get the same answer for all three: employees. Some can be major money-makers for organizations or their only income-generating source. Employees can also be an organization’s megaphone and its best evangelists. The right PR efforts can go a long way in helping with employee satisfaction, engagement, and recruiting.

An internal relations PR pro is not in charge of HR, which handles recruiting, paperwork, benefits, vacations, etc. Instead, they are tasked with the more fun challenge of communicating directly to the employees with distinct purposes like building goodwill, softening changes, or evangelizing employees through tools like internal newsletters and podcasts or private Facebook pages.

 

The Crisis PR, aka the Fire-Stopper:

The Crisis PR, aka the Fire-Stopper:

Photo by Elijah O’Donnell on Unsplash

The fire-stopper evokes images of high-powered geniuses swooping in and out of problems, arriving mid-disaster to assemble triage. Ideally all PR people work ahead of the crisis, preventing it from occurring in the first place through careful planning, immaculate team integration, and representing organizations that are already doing the right thing. But sometimes someone gets caught with their pants down and it’s the fire-stopper’s job to fix it. Fire-stoppers hold the kind of amazing instinct that only comes from years of experience. They’ve spent their careers trying new things by being open to failure, viewing all mistakes as opportunities to learn, and carefully emulating, or sometimes most importantly not emulating, those that have gone before them.

 

Account Director, aka the Strategist:

Every PR campaign should be rooted in strategy. There is a difference between reactively opening a SnapChat account just because someone tells you to and asking why first. The strategist’s job centers around planning, thinking, and calculating so that audiences, goals, and the reasoning behind every action is mapped out before launching head-first into any PR campaign.

 

The SEO PR, aka the Linkbuilder:

The SEO PR, aka the Linkbuilder:

Photo by Elijah O’Donnell on Unsplash

PR pros have been using SEO tactics for years. Google has a complicated algorithm that ranks website pages for specific search terms (keywords) and one of the many factors of ranking well is links. While most PR activities may result in a story that is featured and/or shared online, the SEO PR Pro is primarily focused on getting stories and links for the SEO benefits they provide and as a result, driving performance via search.

Of course, this list is only a beginning. I could go on and on with Social/Influencer PR,  Public Affairs/Lobbyist, PIO, Researchers and many more. Essentially, most PR Pros are hybrids of a few of these.

Which are you?

 

Podcast: Dan Cook: Wikipedia

Podcast: Dan Cook: Wikipedia

Stop Fearing Wikipedia: Dan Cook’s Advice on this Powerful Platform

Over his thirty-year career, Dan Cook has worked as a staff journalist in five different markets, including stops at the Portland Business Journal and Reuters. That work put him in regular contact with public relations professionals of all stripes, and as he notes early on in this interview with PR Talk host Amy Rosenberg, “I’ve learned how to find the ones who can really deliver and I hang onto them for dear life.”

These days, Dan wears many hats. He covers healthcare and benefits trends for BenefitsPro and Benefits Selling Magazine. In this role he works closely with PR pros and throughout his conversation with Amy offered important insight on how they can work collaboratively with the news media.

Dan also works as a communications consultant for To the Point Collaborative, spending most of his time helping clients navigate through the murky waters of Wikipedia.

Wikipedia as a PR Tool? Dan Says YES!

As a Wikipedia consultant, Dan teaches clients how to ethically write and edit their own articles on the world’s online encyclopedia. Most PR pros understand how valuable a good Wikipedia listing is for their clients, but avoid the platform altogether because of its intimidating environment. But instead of fearing the site, Dan feels strongly that PR pros should learn how to use Wikipedia correctly.  

As Dan explains, Wikipedia is run by a group of volunteer editors who take great pains to ensure that every new article and every new edit meets a tight set of community standards. It’s not uncommon to see poorly written or improperly sourced articles pulled down from the site, or for unscrupulous paid editors to receive outright bans.

Proper sourcing is everything on Wikipedia and many paid editors run into trouble when they try to support what they’ve written with external links. According to Wikipedia’s rules, an article cannot link back to a company’s web page. However, if an article can link to sources that were written and edited by a credible third-party–such as a news outlet–it has a great chance of staying live. In Dan’s view, this is where PR pros can shine.

Whenever possible, PR pros should include important factual information in their press releases like the number of employees, key clients, services areas, etc., even if they’re not related to the main subject of the release. That way, any resulting press coverage could potentially be used to support a company’s Wikipedia page.  

Dan offered these additional tips for PR pros interested in getting started on Wikipedia:

  • Contrary to popular opinion, conflicts of interest and paid editing are NOT banned on Wikipedia. In fact, volunteer editors appreciate paid editors who approach the platform correctly.
  • With this in mind, paid editors should be transparent on Wikipedia by choosing their own usernames and not logging in using client accounts.
  • Articles should be written objectively and refrain from sales messaging.

Through To the Point Collaborative, Dan offers Wikipedia training programs that walk clients through the process of creating a transparent Wikipedia account, writing an ideal article draft, or implementing changes to an existing article. Dan also holds occasional Wikipedia “edit-a-thons” where he walks a group through the process of writing an article from start to finish.

PR pros who would like to add this important skill to their communications toolkit can reach out to Dan for more information.

About the guest: Dan Cook

Dan Cook is a writer and researcher. He is a former Portland Business Journal Editor and Reuters reporter. Was on staff at nonprofits Morrison Child & Family Services and Special Olympics Oregon. Currently, he works with To the Point Collaborative as a copywriter, editor, Wikipedia consultant and communications strategist.

Connect and follow Dan on social media:

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Talk is sponsored by monday

In such a fast-paced, multi-faceted work environment, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. monday is the collaboration tool trusted by businesses of all kinds to help cut down the clutter and streamline productivity. Learn more at monday.com and signup for a free trial. You’ll see in no time why so many teams around the world are choosing monday for their project management needs.

PR Talk listeners can use the coupon code BetterExecute for a 15% discount.

Podcast: Bruce Williams: KGW Media Group

Podcast: Bruce Williams: KGW Media Group

KGW’s Ultimate Gatekeeper, Bruce Williams, Tells it Like it Is

Assignment Editor turned “Content Discovery Editor”

I would consider Bruce Williams to be THE source at KGW. A million years ago I would have called him the “Assignment Editor,” but in a world of tweets, chats, and millennials, Bruce’s title has changed to Content Discovery Editor. This is because his role has shifted beyond what you see on TV to include duties for social media and the KGW website.

Back in an easier time, the Assignment Editor was the person I envisioned to be somewhat in charge of the newsroom’s operations for that day. It was their job to scan the news and determine what was going to be covered with the entire team’s input. The Assignment Editor would then “assign” the stories to the reporters and cameras available to them for that day. Basically, this was the person you needed to talk to the day you wanted your story to run for last-minute news.

The Reimagined Role of the Assignment Editor

And….drumroll please….fancy title or not, Bruce is still the person you need to talk with. As I strutted into Bruce’s domain, he showed me his command center, which used to be called the “assignment desk” and now I believe it is called something cooler, but I don’t remember. Centered in the middle of the newsroom, a circular desk equipped with various computer systems and police scanners is slightly perched above the other newsroom desks so they “can yell out across to the other teams.” Wherever you are, whatever you’re working on, if it’s TV news, this is the desk you are calling and the person who answers is the person you need to speak with to garner “day of” or sometimes next day news. Do not confuse this person with the receptionist.

As I kicked off the interview, completely flabbergasted by Bruce’s new title, I wondered how I would communicate that I needed the “assignment editor” now that the long-standing term used in newsrooms across America was no longer valid.

Bruce clarified a new term for me. “You need to know who your gatekeeper is.” Yes! That is exactly it! Bruce went on to possibly confuse us further by saying that the gatekeeper varies from newsroom to newsroom—mentioning that there are a group of gatekeepers at KGW depending on what the story is. Bruce tells us you could go straight to a reporter if your story aligns with a specific beat, to an Executive Producer, or to the web team. But I’ll just add, when all else fails or if you aren’t sure, go to someone like Bruce, whom I consider the ultimate gatekeeper.

Bruce Williams KGW Desk

The Sacred Morning Meeting

Even though no two days are the same in the world of news, envisioning Bruce’s daily schedule might help you wrap your head around how a newsroom operates. Arriving at work before 5:30 a.m., he checks in with the sunrise team to see what they are working on, searches twitter and Facebook, along with the mountain of new emails, and formulates a plan to get available crews out the door covering stories.

The infamous “morning meeting” happens at 9:30 a.m. This is when all the crews come in to discuss story ideas and a plan is formed. If you want day-of news you need to get your information over to them before this time and make sure they are discussing your news at the morning meeting. Of course you would email the information to them, but you can’t assume they received it. I find that a phone call works better than telepathy for checking in. Bruce assures us that he’s happy to take phone calls, saying that he’ll even give you a read on if he thinks something will get covered if you call at the right time—between 7:30 a.m. – 9 a.m. Do not call at 9:30 a.m. (during the morning meeting) nor at 2:30 p.m. because that is when he’s off for the day.

 

The Newsroom Email Address

Bruce reminds us that every newsroom has a generic newsroom email address. KGW’s is [email protected]. If you send your pitch here and it’s compact enough, incorporating a coverage date, it will likely be put in a file for future coverage.

 

The Best Time for a Press Event

Speaking of timing, next I asked Bruce my second favorite question. When is a good time of day for a press event? Sure enough, he answered 10 – 10:30 a.m. if you want to get on the noon news and possibly subsequent shows throughout the afternoon and evening. For general news he said that nighttime events don’t work well, unless the station has a live field reporter (but that wouldn’t be general news, now would it?), or it’s really unique or visual.

 

The Self-Directed Newsroom

Bruce also reminded us that if the event is visual, but stations can’t make it out, you can shoot your own video and/or take your own pictures and send those over for TV stations to air. He assured us that what you capture doesn’t need to be perfect. “Think about what you see on social media, it’s not perfect.” We can submit those through Dropbox or a YouSendIt file.

 

The type of stories Bruce is looking for

  • Things people are talking about.
  • What people are sharing on social media.
  • Local ties to a big national or international story.
  • Is there a visual aspect?
  • Incorporating real people the station can talk to.
  • A benefit to the audience.

 

Bruce’s PR pet peeves:

Luckily for us, Bruce is a pretty easy going guy but he was able to come up with a few PR pet peeves, when asked.

  • PR people that reach out to the press with story pitches, only to be unable to be reached soon after. If it’s time sensitive, make yourself available!
  • PR people who don’t want them to show up with a camera (after sending a pitch to a TV station!?!).

Even though social media and the internet have turned TV news operations into a 24-hour cycle, Bruce’s main function remains the same. In the same way, Bruce’s advice for PR people mirrors this concept. If building relationships and doing whatever it takes to help your contacts sounds like a lot of work, it is. Just as the internet hasn’t yet created a way to take the hustle out of PR, it certainly hasn’t augmented the role of the traditional Assignment Editor quite yet.

About the guest: Bruce Williams

Bruce Williams is the Senior Assignment Manager for the KGW Content Discovery Center at KGW Media Group. Bruce has been with KGW for nearly 10 years and has been in the media world for three decades. He is a(nother) graduate of the Washington State University broadcast journalism school and a huge Cougars sports fan. He’s also the gatekeeper, leading the decisions on where cameras and reporters go.

Connect and follow Bruce on social media:

This episode of PR Talk is brought to you by PRSA Oregon

Throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, PRSA provides members with networking, mentorship, skill building and professional development opportunities – whether you are a new professional fresh out of college or a skilled expert with 20 years in the industry. Check out PRSAoregon.org for more information on how membership can help you grow and connect.

PR Talk is sponsored by monday

In such a fast-paced, multi-faceted work environment, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. monday is the collaboration tool trusted by businesses of all kinds to help cut down the clutter and streamline productivity. Learn more at monday.com and signup for a free trial. You’ll see in no time why so many teams around the world are choosing monday for their project management needs.

PR Talk listeners can use the coupon code BetterExecute for a 15% discount.

Featured image courtesy of Tim Mossholder